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Company reps may face closed doors

EXTERNAL contractors who provide technical support for surgical treatments will be refused access to the biggest orthopaedic hospital in the United Kingdom, unless they comply with a new monitoring system.

The measure will be introduced on March 17 and is designed to remove risks posed to patients, staff and the legal position of the trust that manages the Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital in Stanmore Middlesex.

The management has acted after realising that current procedures governing the admission of company respresentatives to the hospital are “ad-hoc and inconsistent”. As a result, all external employees who wish access to patient-sensitive areas will be required to show that they are members of credential-checking service Who Are You Ltd.

That membership is dependant on the individual being able to demonstrate evidence that they have the clearances and qualifications necessary to justify their presence professionally and legally. Furthermore, from April, these company representatives will be asked to produce evidence from an RNOH clinician that they have been invited to attend.

In a letter to external suppliers, the hospital states: “A failure to comply could result in your organisation representatives being refusd entry to the RNOH.”

The new regime demands that all company representatives can demonstrate or show: 1. Current hepatitis B certificate 2. Current theatre access course accreditation 3. Valid photo ID/check 4. Criminal records check 5. Details of employers’ liability insurance The trust says it has a desire to provide its patients and staff with a “better- regulated and better-controlled hospital”.

Vendor credentialing – HC Skills issues reassurance

AGAINST a backdrop of increased concern about company representatives accessing patient care areas, HC Skills International have issued a reassurance that their qualifications are valid for any credentialing scheme.

We provide credible professional qualifications that are fully accredited and externally validated so that all external personnel can demonstrate a level of competence based on a relevant award.

Our qualifications are compliance-driven and fulfil legal and regulatory requirements as well as meeting the criteria set by professional bodies and other stakeholders.

All of our training programmes follow a blended learning format, consisting of a mixture of online, classroom and practical environment settings.

The standard of both the tuition and examinations is quality assured, as the qualifications are audited by Ofqual.

As opposed a generic certification, the professional theatre access award is a stand-alone qualification on the same framework as that used by the hospitals for other clinical staff.

Many organisations just rubber-stamp training courses. However, a formal qualification provides the evidence that professional competence /excellence has been achieved. Robust examination linked to a regulated qualification satisfies professional standards and practical goals.

From next month (March, 2014), the UK’s largest orthopaedic hospital – the Royal Orthopaedic Hospital in Stanmore, Middlesex (below) – may refuse external company reps access to patient-sensitive areas unless they comply with a new checking system.

Across the UK, several other mandatory vendor credentialing schemes are being introduced – and all are designed to raise standards of patient safety.

royal_orthopaedic

Healthcare training course dates for 2014

HC Skills International have released the full list of healthcare training course dates for 2014. All courses lead to externally validated, competence-based qualifications that are internationally recognised.

These qualifications are compliance-driven and fulfil legal and regulatory requirements as well as meeting the criteria set by professional bodies and other stakeholders. All training programmes are of the highest standard and follow a blended learning format, comprising a mixture of online, classroom and practical environment settings.

They are designed for:

  • External healthcare employees who will be required to demonstrate a level of competence to hospital managements
  • Clinicians who wish to fill an educational role within their employment setting
THEATRE ACCESS – Addenbrooke’s Hospital, Cambridge

January 15, 16

February 10, 11

March 18, 19

April 23, 24

May 12, 13

June 18, 19

September 9, 10

October 8, 9

November 13, 14

December 8, 9

 

Chapel Allerton Hospital, Leeds

February 11, 12

March 12, 13

April 2, 3

May 15, 16

June 12, 13

July 14, 15

September 16, 17

October 14, 15

November 12, 13

December 10, 11

 

ALSO AT

BRUSSELS: June 3, 4. ZURICH: April 10, 11 and September 4, 5. AMSTERDAM: March 6, 7. MADRID: February 17, 18.

 

OTHER COURSES

CLINICAL EDUCATION

The Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons 
of Glasgow

February, 10, 11. May 19, 20. September 24, 25.
December 8, 9.

Weetwood Hall, Leeds

February 17, 18. February 19, 20.

Enrol now by contacting us here.

Medical device course goes live

A CUSTOMISED training programme developed by HC Skills International for the industry body representing the interests of companies providing anaesthetic and respiratory device support to clinicians will be presented for the first time tomorrow.

The hospital Theatre Access programme is being delivered at Addenbrooke’s Hospital in Cambridge for members of Barema who are required to be present in operating theatres, intensive care units and other clinical departments to provide technical support for staff using equipment developed by medical technology firms.

HC Skills, who have led training and qualification access programmes for more than 7,000 industry professionals, announced the key tie-up with Barema in August.

The company will ally their unmatched experience and professionalism with Barema’s position as the United Kingdom’s premier organisation promoting the highest standards in the development of and promotion of medical devices and technology in the anaesthetic and respiratory field.

Diane Irvine, CEO of HC Skills, who are based at the Golden Jubilee National Hospital in Clydebank, near Glasgow, said: “In today’s environment, there is an increased appetite for compliance. Standards of company training in the medtech industry are high, and need to remain high – which is where we come in.”

Achievement of this new qualification will ensure that:

  • THE duty of care to patients is not compromised.
  • SPECIFIC knowledge and understanding has been acquired to demonstrate competence in clinical areas.
  • THE legal and reputational position of the individual as well as that of the employer is safe.
  • THE legal position of the hospital has not been jeopardised.

A spokesman for Barema said: “There is a host of courses available to our members – however, the one we have committed to with HC Skills will see medical device company reps trained and qualified to a level we can support.

“It will be tailored to the anaesthetic and respiratory sector and it is hoped that, later this year, it will receive the approval of the Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland, as it supports best practice.”

Under the prevailing legal conditions in the United Kingdom, no law is broken when medical device company representatives are present in hospital clinical areas.

However, those individuals are required to know and understand the protocols which apply in clinical areas, including those pertaining to patient safety, inoculations, background checks, drug tests, infection control, data protection and other relevant factors.

Yet there is no standardisation among hospitals health boards and trusts of what they require in terms of formal qualifications from external representatives, which creates confusion and disorganisation between hospitals and companies.

This is a key problem, because external employees who are required to be present in clinical areas present an unquantifiable legal risk to themselves, their employers and the hospital.

There are significant risks inherent in the presence in clinical areas of medical devices company representatives, who are a non-contracted third parties able only to justify their role in a practical sense – not in legal or professional terms.

Recognised qualifications reduce or eliminate legal risks to hospital managements and to the medical device company – plus they legitimise the product specialist’s extended role

Raising healthcare compliance training qualification standard

MEDTECH trainers HC Skills International have upped the standard of the Theatre Access qualification courses they offer to medical device industry representatives.

The new award, which is recognised by the UK and European governments, has been raised from Level 4 on the national qualifications framework to Level 5, which is equivalent to second-year undergraduate standard.

HC Skills, who are based at the Golden Jubilee National Hospital in Clydebank, near Glasgow, have led healthcare compliance training and qualification access programmes for more than 7,000 industry professionals to date.

The revised Theatre Access course is aimed at representatives of firms who are required to be present in operating theatres, intensive care units and other clinical departments to provide technical support for staff using equipment developed by medical technology firms.

HC Skills CEO Diane Irvine said: “A regulated qualification that complies with every hospital’s performance standards promotes a level of quality for all medical device and pharma companies and gives all hospitals a uniform assurance for all company representatives that are present in their patient care area.

“We have worked hard to upgrade what was already the definitive qualification in the sector to one that raises the bar and shows our commitment to improving standards of support to hospital clinical teams. Patient safety and best practice are paramount, and this qualification will allow companies to demonstrate a commitment to that.”

There is no law broken when medical device company representatives are present in hospital clinical areas providing verbal technical assistance supporting the safe and effective patient use of their products.

There is a hospital requirement for all company representatives to know and understand the protocols necessary to be present in a clinical areas – including inoculations, background checks, drug tests , infection control and others.

However, there is no standardisation among hospitals or health boards of what they require from company representatives . While one hospital may require background checks (eg paediaric/psychiatric), another may not, creating confusion and disorganisation between hospitals and companies.

Diane Irvine added: “The standards that apply to the development of medical device products are high – and we provide the critical support that company representatives need to safely take those devices to the patient.

“It is clearly in no one’s interest to demean the role or competence of company representatives providing verbal technical assistance for the safe use of products in operating theatres.

“What we provide is academic education allied to practical training and assessment in hospital clinical settings, reflecting reality.”

HC Skills have also just developed a new suite of post-graduate qualifications in medical device regulatory affairs, which will help companies gain a better understanding of compliance and other issues.

All HC Skills courses result in a recognised, externally validated, competence-based qualification, which ensures that the role of the medical technology companies and their representatives are not compromised. Successful candidates are issued with an identity badge, which verifies their professional competence and qualification.

CArd

Their qualifications reduce or eliminate legal risks to hospital managements and to the medical device company – plus they legitimise the product specialist’s extended role and identifies that they are not in the clinical setting as a sales person but as an expert who is able to impart practical knowledge, sometimes under difficult circumstances and at crucial times.

The term “medical device” covers a wide spectrum of healthcare products, ranging from sticking plasters to heart valves. Devices used in clinical areas include surgical instruments, gowns and drapes, operating tables, arterial grafts, orthopaedic implants, ophthalmic implants, anaesthetic machines, patient monitors and X-ray machines.

All of them – and those using them – have to come under the scope of credible training that places the emphasis on successful surgical outcomes and the highest professional standards that will be able to withstand scrutiny, whether clinical, ethical or legal. The professional awards offered by HCS and accredited by internationally recognised education services provider ABP (Association of Business Practitioners) form a credible occupational perioperative standard.

Key partnership with Barema

HC Skills International are pleased to announce a key partnership with Barema, the industry body representing the interests of companies providing anaesthetic and respiratory device support to clinicians.

Under the tie-up with Barema, HC Skills will deliver a customised training qualification for representatives of medical technology firms who are required to be present in operating theatres, intensive care units and other clinical departments to provide technical support for staff using equipment developed by medical technology firms.

HC Skills, who have led training and qualification access programmes for more than 7,000 industry professionals, will ally their unmatched experience and professionalism with Barema’s position as the United Kingdom’s premier organisation promoting the highest standards in the development of and promotion of medical devices and technology in the anaesthetic and respiratory field.

Barema is committed to safeguarding and promoting the best possible patient care by ensuring that its member companies maintain appropriate standards through the education of their company representatives.

A spokesman for Barema said: “There is a host of courses available to our members – however, the one we have committed to with HC Skills will see medical device company reps trained and qualified to a level we can support.

“It will be tailored to the anaesthetic and respiratory sector and it is hoped that, later this year, it will receive the approval of the Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland, as it supports best practice. As a result, we will be promoting this course to our members.”

Diane Irvine, CEO of HC Skills, who are based at the Golden Jubilee National Hospital in Clydebank, said: “The provision of this Barema professional qualification is fantastic, as it demonstrates the recognition that self-regulation is no regulation – especially in today’s environment where there is an increased appetite for compliance.

“Standards of company training in the medtech industry are high, and need to remain high – which is where we come in.”

All HC Skills courses result in government-recognised, externally validated, competence-based qualifications, which ensure that the role of the medical technology companies and their representatives are not compromised.

Present in theatre

As a result of rapid and transformational advances in technology, representatives of medical device companies are regularly present in operating theatres during surgery, in intensive care departments and other hospital environments so they can provide essential practical support and expertise to clinical teams on the use of medical equipment.

Few patients are treated without relying on equipment and expertise provided by Barema companies. Everything from the simplest piece of tubing to state-of-the-art anaesthetic machines and monitors are provided and supported in-situ by these firms.

Achievement of this new qualification, which will be presented for the first time in October at Addenbrooke’s Hospital in Cambridge, will ensure that:

  • THE duty of care to patients is not compromised.
  • SPECIFIC knowledge and understanding has been acquired to demonstrate competence in clinical areas.
  • THE legal and reputational position of the individual as well as that of the employer is safe.
  • THE legal position of the hospital has not been jeopardised.

Under the prevailing legal conditions in the United Kingdom, no law is broken when medical device company representatives are present in hospital clinical areas.

Diane Irvine talks about Barema tie-up

However, those individuals are required to know and understand the protocols which apply in clinical areas, including those governing patient safety, inoculations, background checks, drug tests, infection control, data protection and other relevant factors.

Yet there is no standardisation among hospitals health boards and trusts of what they require in terms of formal qualifications from external representatives. While one hospital may require background checks, another may not, creating confusion and disorganisation between hospitals and companies.

This is a key problem, because external employees who are required to be present in clinical areas present an unquantifiable legal risk to themselves, their employers and the hospital.

Significant risks

There are significant risks inherent in the presence in clinical areas of medical devices company representatives, who are a non-contracted third parties able only to justify their role in a practical sense – not in legal or professional terms.

Recognised qualifications reduce or eliminate legal risks to hospital managements and to the medical device company – plus they legitimise the product specialist’s extended role and identifies that they are not in the clinical setting as a sales person but as an expert who is able to impart practical knowledge, sometimes under difficult circumstances and at crucial times.

The term “medical device” covers a wide spectrum of healthcare products, ranging from sticking plasters to heart valves. Devices used in clinical areas include surgical instruments, gowns and drapes, operating tables, arterial grafts, orthopaedic implants, ophthalmic implants, anaesthetic machines, patient monitors and X-ray machines.

All of them – and those using them – have to come under the scope of credible training that places the emphasis on successful surgical outcomes and the highest professional standards that will be able to withstand scrutiny, whether clinical, ethical or legal.

The professional awards offered by HCS and accredited by internationally recognised education services provider ABP (Association of Business Practitioners) form a credible occupational perioperative standard.

Barema logo medtech

Plaudits for clinical education course

ANOTHER of our courses has elicited a flood of flattering comments, which is yet again testament to the professionalism and dedication of the HC Skills team, wherever they deliver our programmes.

This time, it was a post-graduate diploma course in Clinical Education delivered at the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow in the United Kingdom.

The course leader Graham Sunderland, consultant surgeon, said: ’”I love teaching this course – always learn something new and watching the delegates develop and grow in confidence is very rewarding.

The positive comments included:

I thank you for a truly outstanding Diploma in Clinical Education course.  I very much enjoyed it and have gained some excellent new skills.

AND

After completing the course, I went to Milan for the European Oral Surgery Board Fellowship exam, as a part of which, I was required to present four surgical cases to the exam board. I’m happy to report that I have passed. In addition, the following day at the conference, one of the board examiners came up to congratulate me and then invited me to Beirut and deliver a lecture to his final-year dental students on a topic of my choice, stating that he really liked my presentation style. I was flattered and have graciously accepted.

AND

This is indeed a testament to the strength of the course, delivered by an amazing team of professionals in an exceptional manner. It has invigorated a sense of confidence with public speaking in me that I never imagined likely. I am now very keen on developing this further and would appreciate any help you could please offer to this effect.

Graham Sunderland added: ”If you’re only going to do one course – this is the one! If you’re going to be involved in teaching clinical skills, go on this course.

“It’s a great course, preparing clinicians to get the best out of any kind of teaching event.”

rcspg-logo

Get re-accreditation right

OR Access Course, LeedsOUR online learning programme has recently been attracting a lot of interest – from those who have completed our taught programmes and from newcomers to the medical device sector.

We have developed a sophisticated web-based learning management system in response to a need for a quick re-accreditation system of the highest quality which acknowledges a delegate’s past qualifications and allows them to fast-track themselves to re-certification.

Our online programme is normally only available only to those who have completed one of our taught programmes but it can be tailored to suit a client company’s bespoke needs. Please feel free to contact us for details.

DELEGATES who have successfully completed the Professional Operating Theatre Access Qualification should go through a process of re-accreditation every two years to ensure that their professional competence is maintained.

HC Skills International facilitates
re-accreditation via its own state-of-the-art online learning management system, which gives those who enrol a period of up to 30 days to complete their re-certification through a programme which involves:

  • A multiple-choice questionnaire
  • A clinical risk-management exercise
  • A handwash/scrub assessment form

All reading materials are provided, and the course structure is similar to HC Skills’ one-day taught programme, which aims to ensure that delegates meet the standards currently required by hospital management to work in operating theatres.

The online re-validation provides evidence that participants have maintained best practice, that their skills have been updated and that their current competencies meet the requirements of their role.

The need for re-accreditation is vital because “anyone who is invited into areas of clinical care in an advisory capacity is bound by the same legal and ethical obligations as those employed by hospitals” (NHS Code of Practice).

Furthermore, individual theatre managers, directors of nursing and trust general managers may decide that companies should be required to provide proof of training to an established standard to obtain entry to clinical areas.

Hospitals have to assess and manage the risks associated with the presence of a medical device company representative in theatre to demonstrate a device and facilitate training while that device is being used on a patient.

Hospital staff have a duty of care to patients and, therefore, must be competent in the use of any medical device implanted in or connected to the patient. Demonstrations of new technology or any associated practical instruction must take place prior to direct patient use.

Within this scenario, medical device companies have a duty of care to provide hospital managers with proof that the representative has attained a valid, recognised qualification that demonstrates an acceptable level of competence.

The delegate protocol timeline is active for 30 days – during which regular contact with a mentor takes place – and follows the following format:

  • Tuesday 1: Receive login information and instructions
  • Tuesday 2: Receive reminder to download and complete your photo  ID and practical form
  • Tuesday 3: Your manager is notified of your progress
  • Tuesday 4: Log-in expires

There are many and varied training programmes for the medical devices industry. Maximise your investment with a professional qualification from a government-awarding body.

Healthcare training – horses for courses

JUST because you are born in a stable does not make you a horse – and the same principle applies to the qualifications we provide.

Our healthcare training programmes are approved by relevant organisations including Government awarding bodies in the United Kingdom, the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons Glasgow, and other professional bodies and healthcare stakeholders.

However, the fact they are recognised does not, in of itself, make our qualifications the best on the market – although we are proud of our association with some of the biggest and best companies and bodies in Europe.

Take HC Skills International’s Operating Theatre Access qualification. The reason it stands apart from others on the market in the UK, Europe and beyond because it develops the knowledge and skills which operating theatre managements expect of medical device industry personnel entering, assisting and providing verbal/technical input within operating theatre departments.

It also blends practical, online and theoretical learning in a manner that ensures all relevant competences are comprehensively covered.

HC Skills International Hospital Theatre Access training course at Chapel Allerton Hospital Leeds, July 17 & 18, 2013.

Best practice in practice … delegates at our theatre access training course at Chapel Allerton Hospital

Some healthcare organisations provide generic training of questionable quality that does not provide the evidence that professional competence or excellence has been achieved.

Some of them provide low-cost, online-only learning programmes that leave out critical practical aspects altogether.

We do not subscribe to this approach. Hence the horse analogy in the introductory paragraph. Just because you provide training does not mean you are a credible or reputable training provider.

To us, robust examination and practical application, linked to a regulated qualification, is the only way to achieve professional standards and practical goals – AND provide a stake in the process.

The purpose of our theatre access qualification is to orientate delegates to accepted departmental protocols and best practice for those entering the operating theatre or working in the operating theatre environment.

Medical device industry personnel entering and assisting within theatres will, on successful completion of our course, be able to:

  • Demonstrate in the hospital setting the knowledge and skills required when working in the operating theatre environment which encompasses the principles of safe practice and includes theatre etiquette, protocols and procedures.
  • Identify the range of health and safety requirements required by Hospitals
  • Demonstrate in the clinical setting their personal ability to comply with the principles of standard precautions and infection control within the operating department.
  • Plan, implement and evaluate a product sales support session in which they demonstrate a piece of equipment for which they have sales and backup responsibility .

To achieve this qualification, delegates must participate in practical and theoretical assessments. This means they have to:

  1. Complete a comprehensive written assessment of the principles of safe practice within the operating department, using a risk management approach and providing reasoned arguments for decisions.
  2. Undergo a multiple-choice questionnaire covering all aspects of the taught Theatre Skills unit and its pre-course reading.
  3. Demonstrate personal competencies in an actual hospital theatre under simulated conditions.

Medical device industry personnel required to enter and assist within theatres will, if successful, meet the needs of operating theatre management and their employers by ensuring that all who enter the operating theatre are competent in the principles of safe theatre practice.

They will also be able to:

  • Apply the principles of safe practice within the operating theatre environment
  • Identify and take appropriate action to manage the risks and potential hazards associated with the theatre environment
  • Identify and comply with the health and safety requirements of the hospital within which they are working
  • Apply the principles of standard precautions and infection control within the operating department

The assessment process has been designed to ensure that each assessment criterion covers the full range of issues taught on the programme in such a way that candidates are required both to demonstrate their knowledge of the issues, interpret that knowledge in a reflective practice exercise and apply the knowledge in a clinical situation.

All the HC Skills mentors  have considerable experience of teaching and assessing on the programme. They also serve as a support and quality control network for lecturers and assessors in their own disciplines. Other specialists are also available on each course to provide support for peers and students in other disciplines.

Praise for hospital theatre access courses

THE hospital theatre (OR) access courses run by HC Skills International have been winning high praise.

One of our recent training programmes – on May 21 and 22 at St Vincent’s Private Hospital in Dublin, Ireland – proved to be a case in point.

The majority of delegates were seasoned healthcare industry professionals, yet even they admitted they had gained hugely from participation.

The positive sentiments were echoed by those of other delegates who attended other OR access courses hosted in recent weeks by HC Skills at various venues across Europe, including the Nuffield Hospital in Leeds, Addenbrookes in Cambridge and at our host venue in Mechelen, Belgium.

Here’s what some of our delegates have told us:

St Vincent's Dublin

DUBLIN – St Vincent’s

The course brilliantly done and the mood is kept light hearted, which helps. Excellent communication skills and presentation style. An excellent course; many thanks to all.

Worthwhile course, full of relevant info. Very useful and really liked the “real life” cases and examples which helps clarify the theory.

AND

Simple things I took for granted, I now understand their importance i.e. sterile field, how much we are legally bound to everything that we do.

Also how much trouble we could get in to if we didn’t “stay in our box”, the importance of the huge amount of risk around us every day, the responsibility my role holds and the serious implications that can occur, not to take for granted the small everyday duties I do without risk managing them and thinking of hospital policy, obligations out of duty of care to patients.

AND

As a result of this course, I will be more aware in theatre; take a second to think about all key actions in my day to day work, think about how I say and do things; make sure that I know what I am allowed and to allowed to do.
I am also much more aware of my actions and verbal communications and their possible liability; my duty of care to the patient. This course has really highlighted  the need to keep patient as number one priority.

Nuffield Hospital, Leeds

LEEDS – Nuffield Hospital (April 22/23)

The course has given the team the confidence to go into the theatre environment – it has taken away the fear element. We now know how to work in the OR environment with minimal risk of hazards and litigation

The explanation of hand washing was excellent. The legal side was very interesting but hugely important to make you realise the importance of sticking to your role and not taking on tasks you are not qualified to do.

Other aspects I found criticial were: learning how to advance sales and approach new customers for our product; legal implications of my actions, the importance of showing theatre managers you are competent, patient safety, how to assure that the staff have confidence in me.

AND

I will be more aware of my behaviour in a theatre setting by risk assessing more often than before and more legally aware of my role and how my actions can have repercussions to my employer.

AND

Brilliant! Thank you very much. I believe that the course is perfect the way it is now – it combines the theoretical aspects with a practical session, making it very enjoyable and easy for learning. Very good speakers and presentations.

Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge

CAMBRIDGE – Addenbrooke’s Hospital (May 13/14)

I learned that your actions, no matter how small, can have a large impact on the patient and yourself if done incorrectly. Learning about the medical legal aspect was also important to me.

I have to admit that a lot of my learned observation of behaviour in theatre was wrong behaviour. Not any more.

AND

From now on, I will enter the OR with completely different approach, actions and questions; know local procedures and protocols.

I will also risk assess in greater detail and document everything, I will be more aware in the OR and wash hands more frequently.

Furthermore, I will be aware of the risks involved and implement the practices I have learnt to ensure patient, hospital, company and my safety.

AND

Very good course, which is going to help me in my day-to-day role. It has been a great two days and I have learnt much more than expected. Fantastic course, well done.

HC Skills International are delighted to share these hugely positive reviews of our programmes, which we believe to be the best available on the market today.

With an HC Skills International qualification, medical device, pharmaceutical and other related company representatives who are required to be present in clinical areas in order to provide technical support become able to formally demonstrate their professional competence and justify their presence, eliminating legal risks to their employers and to hospital managements and thereby ensuring that patient safety remains paramount.

Our courses are definitive, professional and appropriate and are recognised throughout Europe. They are formal, accredited qualifications to a designated level within the United Kingdom national framework and issued by a UK government-regulated awarding body.

Furthermore, the certifications are recognised by regulatory agencies, the Royal College of Surgeons of Glasgow, hospital managements, insurers, key professional bodies and trade associations.